Adiza and Harnaik Must Stay!

Emma Ginn


Adiza Alhassan is a young woman from Ghana. In March 2002 during a power struggle between the Abudu's and Andani kingship families, Adiza's parents were brutally killed in the Yendi tribal massacre in the north of Ghana. Adiza is Andani and the King who was killed in the massacre was her uncle his Royal Highness Andani Yayubu II, the Lion of Dagbon, also known as Ya Na. A state of emergency was declared and the UN was deployed to restore order. Overall some 30 people were killed and their homes destroyed.



Adiza was forced to flee. She ran away to the capital city, Accra. She was destitute and lived amongst the stalls in the open-air marketplace. She lived in fear, as due to the tribal markings on her face, she is easily identifiable to those who may try to harm her.



Whilst staying in the marketplace, she begged for work to survive. In June 2002 she was promised a job as a home help in the UK but on arrival she discovered that she had actually been trafficked for prostitution.



Adiza says she was held captive in London for three weeks during which time she was starved some of the days and suffered verbal and physical abuse.



Adiza managed to get away after three weeks, but was severely traumatised. She struggled to speak English having had little education. She managed to find people to help her. She did not know what "asylum" was - it was an unfamiliar concept to her.



In 2004 she had her son, Harnaik. Just before he was born she sought asylum in this country with the help of her midwife.



Adiza and Harnaik have both thrived with the support of various Christian church communities.



They are now loved and valued members of the congregation at The United Church, Hyde, which is within the Tameside Fellowship of Churches.



Adiza is terrified of being deported. She fears for the life of herself and her son. The tribal conflicts persist, even in Accra, and the Yendi Kingship has still not been resolved.



The Home Office stated that Adiza is a 'credible witness' and accepted her story but said she would not be persecuted if she returns. As a single mother, Adiza says she would face persecution and that she and Harnaik would be in great danger if she were removed to Ghana.



Please support Adiza and Harnaiks' campaign to stay. All they want is to be safe.

 

What you can do to help:


The Adiza & Harnaik Must Stay Campaign would like supporters to signatures on the Petition (wording below) asking the Minister for Immigration to allow Adiza and Harnaik to remain in the UK and live in safety in Hyde where they now belong. The Campaign will gather the completed Petition sheets and present them to Liam Byrne, the Minister for Immigration.



Please return all complete Petition sheets to the Adiza & Harnaik Must Stay Campaign at:

The Adiza & Harnaik Must Stay Campaign
United Church,
Union Street,
Hyde,
Cheshire,
SK14 1ND

S.Smith@mmu.ac.uk

Thank you for your support!
 

Petition

Let Adiza & Harnaik Stay ! Adiza Alhassan – Home Office ref no. A1223083

Adiza is a young woman from Ghana. In March 2002 her parents were brutally killed in the Yendi tribal massacre in the north of Ghana. A state of emergency was declared and the UN was deployed to restore order. Overall some 30 people were killed and their homes destroyed.

Adiza was forced to flee. She ran away to the capital city, Accra. She was destitute and lived amongst the stalls in the open-air marketplace. She lived in fear, as due to the tribal markings on her face, she is easily identifiable to those who may try to harm her. Whilst staying in the marketplace, she begged for work to survive.

In June 2002 she was promised a job as a home help in the UK but on arrival she discovered that she had actually been trafficked for prostitution. Adiza says she was held captive in London for three weeks during which time she was starved some of the days and suffered verbal and physical abuse.

Adiza managed to get away after three weeks, but was severely traumatised. She struggled to speak English having had little education. She managed to find people to help her. She did not know what “asylum” was – it was an unfamiliar concept to her. In 2004 she had her son, Harnaik. Just before he was born, she sought asylum in this country with the help of her midwife.

Adiza and Harnaik have both thrived with the support of various Christian church communities. They are now loved and valued members of the congregation at The United Church, Hyde, which is within the Tameside Fellowship of Churches.

Adiza is terrified of being deported. She fears for the life of herself and her son. The tribal conflicts persist, even in Accra, and the Yendi Kingship has still not been resolved. The Home Office said Adiza is a 'credible witness', accepting her story, but said she would not be persecuted if she returns. As a single mother, Adiza says she would be persecuted and that she and Harnaik would be in great danger.

We, the undersigned, ask the immigration minister, Liam Byrne, to review Adiza's claim for asylum and grant her leave to remain on compassionate grounds.
 

June 2006

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